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Rail rider setup

Discussion in 'Building tips' started by Ricky_Bobby, Dec 9, 2018.

  1. Ricky_Bobby

    Ricky_Bobby Pinewood Ninja

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    I am setting up my sons scout car to run as a rail rider this year. I have the rear axles drilled to run at 3 degrees, but my real question is the DFW. Should the steering axle be inserted with the bend facing up and rotated ccw to set the steer, or with the bend facing down and rotated cw to set the steer? With it facing up, it seems it would run more on the axle head creating less friction. Am on totally wrong on this?
     
  2. TRE

    TRE PWD Royalty Pro Racer Pro Race Winner

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    facing down
     
  3. Ricky_Bobby

    Ricky_Bobby Pinewood Ninja

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    So the friction of the hub against the body is more desirable than the wheel against the nail head
     
  4. TRE

    TRE PWD Royalty Pro Racer Pro Race Winner

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    yes put some clear nail polish or super on the body if you cant run washers
     
  5. Ricky_Bobby

    Ricky_Bobby Pinewood Ninja

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    I can't run washers....thanks for the tip!
     
  6. TRE

    TRE PWD Royalty Pro Racer Pro Race Winner

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    that should have said super glue
     
  7. Ricky_Bobby

    Ricky_Bobby Pinewood Ninja

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    Gotcha....I figured that's what you meant
     
  8. Thinkin'Bout Racin

    Thinkin'Bout Racin League Racer

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    TRE has you "pointed" in the right direction. I know ...bad pun!

    Yes, the axle turned down is the best way. Some claim that it helps the wheel roll over the track joint imperfections vs. trying to climb up them.

    I think I read in another thread that you would have access to the track before the races. If that is the case you can fine tune your steer at that time. Normally for a Cub car the recommended steer amount is about 5"-6" over four feet. That is a good starting point. I would take a previous years car if you can and run it next to this years car. Especially if last years car wiggles (the more the better). That way you can adjust this years car to run stable while running next to a car that has a case of the wiggles. That way if your Cub draws a shake monster in the next lane, you will be just fine.

    BTW, I would listen to TRE as he can build a REALLY FAST car!

    Good Luck
     
  9. Ricky_Bobby

    Ricky_Bobby Pinewood Ninja

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    I am soaking up all the info like a sponge! I will be able to fine tune using the track we race on. I have all my sons previous cars and they will be used in the testing process. Our race chief said the more the merrier. He wants to run a bunch of races to make sure he's ready for the offical race. I appreciate all the tips you guys are giving me, thanks!
     
  10. Roger Osborne

    Roger Osborne Hammering Axles

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    Quick question, is there any benefit with a 1/16 sanded front if you only can use a straight axle?
     
  11. Thinkin'Bout Racin

    Thinkin'Bout Racin League Racer

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    I am not sure quite what you are asking ….there is always a benefit to be gained by having a smaller cross section of the car exposed to air. But remember that you need to finish the race in order to win. Too small of a nose could cause breakage in the stop section of the track depending on how god the track is.

    Also, are you saying the axle must be straight or that it must be installed straight?
     
  12. Roger Osborne

    Roger Osborne Hammering Axles

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  13. Thinkin'Bout Racin

    Thinkin'Bout Racin League Racer

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    If the axle must be straight, then the best way to have the rail rider is to drill the axle hole at an angle. Then install your straight axle. If the axle must be "straight" and installed perpendicular to the long axis of the car, then you can take another approach. None of the stock BSA axle are straight out of the box. Find the one that is the least straight and save it for the FDW. Prep them all and install the non-straight axle and turn it so the car rides against the rail as much as possible .

    So yes, if you were asking about narrowing the front 1/16", it will help to keep the back wheels off the rail.
     
  14. Roger Osborne

    Roger Osborne Hammering Axles

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    Thank you.
     
  15. DerbyDad4Hire

    DerbyDad4Hire Administrator Staff Member 25+ Pro Race Wins! National Champion

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    Yes it is best to narrow the front. The main goal is to keep the rear wheels front touching the rail.
     

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